Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program for Students and Employees

The Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program was designed to educate students and employees about alcohol and drug abuse in an effort to encourage responsible decisions around their use as well as provide resources for those who have experienced the consequences around alcohol and drugs. The College uses a three-pronged approach to the program that incorporates education, promoting awareness, and active engagement through hands-on learning activities, both on-campus and in virtual environments.

We aim to:

  • Support students and employees who are in recovery from substance abuse and addiction
  • Encourage constructive lifestyles and norms that discourage abuse of alcohol and drugs
  • Develop an environment that facilitates alcohol and drug abuse-free lifestyles

Activities Prohibited by Tulsa Community College

Tulsa Community College prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of drugs and alcohol in the workplace, on College property, or as part of College-sponsored activities. Provided, however, the use of alcohol may be permitted by the College at "College-sponsored" or College authorized activities as approved by the Senior Vice President, Chief Academic Officer, the Vice President for Administration and Chief Operating Officer, and with the collaboration of TCC Police.

Health Risks

Serious health risks associated with the use of drugs or the abuse of alcohol include, but are not limited to:

  • addiction to or dependency upon the substance
  • memory loss
  • liver failure
  • kidney failure
  • cancer of the kidney or liver
  • personal injuries while under the influence
  • infectious diseases including AIDS (if needles or other delivery devices are shared)
  • a lowered immune system
  • heart damage
  • loss of ability to concentrate or reason
  • personality changes
  • hallucinations
  • delusions
  • depression
  • inability to sleep or to remain awake
  • loss of judgment
  • death

The use of drugs or alcohol before or during pregnancy can lead to birth defects or death for the children involved.

The following information on health risks is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the SUNY Student Conduct Institute’s Complying with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (DFSCR) guidance:

Marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug in the United States, and marijuana use may have a wide range of health effects on the body and brain. Additionally, MDMA—or more commonly known as Molly—and misuse of Prescription Opioids continue to be of concern for health and law-enforcement officials, nationwide.

Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assaults

Even more alarming is the increase in drug-facilitated sexual assaults. Drug-facilitated sexual assault occurs when drugs are used to compromise an individual’s ability to consent to sexual activity. Rohypnol®, GHB, or Ketamine are the three drugs that are commonly utilized in these attacks. While GHB and Ketamine are legal when used as prescribed and under strict medical supervision, they pose specific dangers that all students and employees should be aware of, particularly in social settings.

Rohypnol® is known for its strong sedation effects and offenders may dissolve the drug in a person’s drink without their knowledge. Ketamine is another dissociative drug that can cause the user to feel detached from reality. Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a depressant approved for use in the treatment of narcolepsy, a disorder that can cause daytime “sleep attacks.” For additional information see Drug Types.

If an individual believes they or a friend have consumed Rohypnol®, GHB, or Ketamine they should visit a local healthcare facility that can care for survivors of sexual assault and provide a forensic exam. While receiving care the individual who has ingested the drug can request the hospital to take a urine sample for drug toxicology testing. If the individual cannot immediately go to a hospital, they should save their urine in a clean, sealable container as soon as possible, and place it in the refrigerator or freezer for future toxicology testing.

Drug Types

Marijuana

General

Marijuana is typically smoked in the form of hand-rolled cigarettes (joints), in pipes or water pipes (bongs), in bowls, or in blunts – emptied cigars that have been partly or completely filled with marijuana.

About 1 in 10 users experience some form of addiction. For people who begin using before the age of 18, that number increases to 1 in 6.

It is also important to note the amount of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in marijuana (i.e. marijuana potency or strength) has increased over the past decade. The higher the THC content, the stronger the effects on the brain. Some methods of marijuana use (e.g. dabbing, edibles) may deliver very high levels of THC to the user.

Misuse

Marijuana use, especially frequent (daily or near-daily) use and use in high doses, can cause disorientation, and sometimes unpleasant thoughts or feelings.

Some people who are addicted may need to increase the amount of marijuana more and more in order to get the same high.

Health Risks

  • Smoked marijuana, in any form, can harm lung tissues and cause scarring and damage to small blood vessels.
  • Smoke from marijuana contains many of the same toxins, irritants, and carcinogens as tobacco smoke.
  • Smoking marijuana can also lead to a greater risk of bronchitis, cough, and phlegm production. These symptoms generally improve when a person quits marijuana.
  • Marijuana is associated with temporary psychosis (not knowing what is real, hallucinations and paranoia) and long-lasting mental health challenges, including schizophrenia (a type of mental illness where people might see or hear things that aren’t really there.)
  • Marijuana use has also been linked to depression and anxiety, and suicide among teens. However, it is not known whether this is a causal relationship or simply an association.

MDMA (slang – “Molly”)

General

This is generally taken as a capsule or tablet, but it can also be swallowed in liquid form or snorted when in powder form. Some people take MDMA in combination with other drugs such as alcohol or marijuana.

MDMA’s effects last about three to six hours.

Misuse

Over the course of a week following moderate use of the drug, a person may experience irritability, impulsiveness and aggression, depression, sleep problems, anxiety, memory and attention problems, decreased appetite, and decreased interest in and pleasure from sex.

Health Risks

High doses of MDMA can affect the body’s ability to regulate temperature. This can lead to a spike in body temperature that can result in liver, kidney, heart failure, or even death.

Other health effects include nausea, muscle cramping, involuntary teeth clenching, blurred vision, chills, and sweating.

Prescription Opioids

General

Prescription opioids used for pain relief are generally safe when used as prescribed by a doctor, but they can be misused.

Opioids bind to and activate opioid receptors on cells located in many areas of the brain, spinal cord, and other organs in the body. When opioids attach to these receptors, they block pain signals sent from the brain to the body and release large amounts of dopamine throughout the body. This release can strongly reinforce the act of taking the drug, making the user want to repeat the experience.

Misuse

People addicted to an opioid medication who stop using the drug can have severe withdrawal symptoms that begin as early as a few hours after the drug was last taken.

Health Risks

People experience withdrawal symptoms including muscle and bone pain, sleep problems, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes with goose bumps, uncontrollable leg movements, and severe cravings.

An opioid overdose occurs when a person uses enough of the drug to produce life-threatening symptoms or death. When people overdose on opioid medication, their breathing often slows or stops. This can decrease the amount of oxygen that reaches the brain, which can result in coma, permanent brain damage, or death.

If you suspect someone has overdosed, call 911 immediately. If needed, medical personnel will administer naloxone. Naloxone is a medicine that can treat an overdose when given right away. It works by rapidly binding to opioid receptors and blocking the effects of the drug. Naloxone is available as an injectable (needle) solution, a hand-held auto-injector (EVZIO®), and a nasal spray (NARCAN® Nasal Spray).

Rohypnol® (also known as “Roofies”)

General

One of the three main sexual assault drugs, it is also known as Flunitrazepam and is not approved in the United States.

It is most commonly found in tablet form which is consumed by drinking or swallowing it.

Misuse

Any use of this drug is misused as the drug is outlawed in the United States.

Health Risks

Possible short-term health effects include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Sedation
  • Sleep
  • Amnesia
  • Blackout
  • Decreased anxiety
  • Muscle relaxation
  • Impaired reaction time and motor coordination
  • Impaired mental functioning and judgment
  • Confusion
  • Aggression
  • Excitability
  • Slurred speech
  • Headache
  • Slowed breathing and heart rate

When combined with alcohol the health effects include severe sedation, unconsciousness, and slowed heart rate and breathing, which can lead to death.

Rohypnol® can take between 36–72 hours to leave the body.

GHB (Gamma-Hydroxybutyric Acid)

General

One of the three main sexual assault drugs.

GHB is a depressant approved for the use of narcolepsy and commonly goes by the other names of Goop, liquid ecstasy, and liquid X. It is most commonly found as a colorless liquid or white powder which is consumed through swallowing, often in combination with alcohol.

Misuse

Using the drug outside of any doctor-prescribed treatment or using it for any other purpose than to treat narcolepsy.

Health Risks

Possible short-term effects include:

  • Euphoria
  • Drowsiness
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Confusion
  • Memory loss
  • Unconsciousness
  • Slowed heart rate and breath
  • Lower body temperature
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death

In combination with alcohol the health effects include nausea, breathing problems, and greatly increased depressant effects.

GHB, unlike Rohypnol®, leaves the body between 10–12 hours after consumption.

Ketamine

General

One of the three main sexual assault drugs.

Ketamine is a dissociative drug used as a surgical anesthetic in veterinary practice, and as a prescription for treatment-resistant depression under strict medical supervision.

It is most commonly found in liquid or white powder form and is consumed by swallowing, smoking, snorting, or injections.

Misuse

Misuse of this drug occurs when taken outside of any supervised medical treatment, such as for treating Narcolepsy.

Health Risks

Short-term health effects include:

  • Problems with attention, learning, and memory; dreamlike states
  • Hallucinations
  • Sedation
  • Confusion or memory loss
  • Raised blood pressure
  • Unconsciousness
  • Slowed breathing

Long-term health effects include:

  • Ulcers and bladder pain
  • Kidney problems
  • Stomach pain
  • Depression
  • Poor memory

Counseling, Prevention, and Educational Programs

The following counseling, prevention, and educational programs are available to students and employees:

  • Students may obtain educational literature with respect to alcohol and drug abuse from Student Life and Wellness Services. Students needing assistance on a voluntary basis are encouraged to contact the Dean of Student Success and Campus Operations or Wellness Services at wellness@tulsacc.edu. Students may also be referred for assistance by their instructor, advisor, the Director of Civil Rights Compliance/Title IX Coordinator, or the Dean of Student Success and Campus Operations. Anyone referred for assistance should reach out to make an appointment with the Dean of Student Success and Campus Operations office.
  • Employees also may obtain educational literature with respect to alcohol and drug abuse from the Human Resources department. Additionally, other services such as counseling, online courses, webinars, and articles are available to employees and members of their immediate family through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) as well. Employees needing assistance on a voluntary basis may contact the EAP directly by calling 1-800-327-2251. Supervisors interested in referring employees for assistance may contact the Human Resources department or provide the employee with the EAP contact information directly. Any assistance provided is confidential unless it is being mandated as part of a performance improvement plan (PIP) and may include referral to outside services.
  • Employees and students may also contact COPES at 918-744-4800. Community Outreach Psychiatric Emergency Services, a free and confidential 24/7 telephone crisis line and mobile crisis service, provides emotional support for children and adults in suicidal crises or emotional distress.
  • The College provides various Drug and Alcohol Awareness Programs to employees and students each year. Human Resources, Academic Affairs, and Student Success and Equity collaborate to provide educational programming throughout the academic year.

Legal Sanctions

BR.06.D – Drug and Alcohol-Free Environment, 2020–21 Board of Regents Policy Manual

The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of drugs or alcohol in the workplace, on College property, or as part of College-sponsored activities is strictly prohibited. Provided, however, the use of alcohol may be permitted by the College at College-sponsored or College-authorized activities as approved by the Vice President and Senior Vice President and Chief Academic Officer, and the Vice President for Administration. Students or employees who violate this policy are subject to both the institution’s sanctions and to criminal sanctions provided by federal, state, and local law.

EH.13.F – Drug and Alcohol-Free Environment, 2021–22 Employee Handbook

Tulsa Community College is a drug and alcohol-free workplace. All TCC employees are prohibited from unlawfully manufacturing, distributing, dispensing, possessing, using, or being under the influence of a controlled substance or alcohol during scheduled work hours; while operating a state vehicle; on state property; or at the employee’s workplace. All TCC employees are also prohibited from soliciting prescription medication from employees, vendors, or customers.

EH.13.G – Drug and Alcohol Testing, 2021–22 Employee Handbook

All TCC employees are subject to testing for alcohol or drug use in the workplace. TCC may require an employee to submit to an alcohol or drug test for cause or following an accident in the workplace. TCC may require an employee to submit to post-accident alcohol or drug testing if the employee or another person is injured in the workplace or if property or equipment has been damaged in the workplace. 40 O.S. § 557. Employees in a safety-sensitive position may fall under U.S. Department of Transportation regulations for alcohol and drug testing, specifically Controlled Substance Testing (49 CFR § 391.81 et seq.), Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug Testing Programs (49 CFR § 40.1 et seq.), and other applicable federal statutes and regulations. These employees will be tested according to U.S. DOT regulations.

EH.13.H – Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program, 2021–22 Employee Handbook

Employees are encouraged to voluntarily seek treatment for alcohol or drug dependency. Evaluation and assessment services performed by the Employee Assistance Program are free and confidential. The EAP can also provide referrals to appropriate resources. Successful completion of a voluntary rehabilitation or treatment program will in no way jeopardize an employee's job opportunities at TCC. However, seeking assistance from the EAP or a treatment or rehabilitation program will not protect an employee from disciplinary action for violation of this policy.

Internal Sanctions

The College will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees who unlawfully manufacture, distribute, possess or use illegal drugs or alcohol in the workplace, on College property, or as part of a College-sponsored event. Violations of these standards of conduct can result in referral for a criminal prosecution, a requirement of satisfactory completion of an appropriate drug or alcohol rehabilitation program, suspension or expulsion from the College, and disciplinary action up to and including termination from employment. A criminal conviction is not required for sanctions to be imposed upon a student or employee for violation of this policy.

External Sanctions

Local, state, and federal laws provide for a variety of legal sanctions for the unlawful possession and distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol. These sanctions include but are not limited to, incarceration and monetary fines.

Federal law provides rather severe penalties for distributing or dispensing, or possessing with the intent to distribute or dispense, a controlled substance, and penalties of a less severe nature for simple possession of a controlled substance. The type and quantity of the drug, whether the convicted person has any prior convictions, and whether death or previous injury resulted from the use of the drug in question.

For example, possession of 100–999 grams mixture of Heroin is involved and it is your first offense, you are subject to not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $2 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual. If between 1kg or more mixture and it is your first offense, you are subject to not less than 10 years, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $4 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual. Two or more offenses may have harsher penalties including up to Life imprisonment.

According to the Uniform Controlled Dangerous Substances Act, any person who violates any provision of this section by transporting with intent to distribute or dispense, distributing or possessing with intent to distribute a controlled dangerous substance to a person, or violation of subsection G of this section, in or on, or within 2,000 feet of the real property comprising a public or private elementary or secondary school, public vocational school, public or private college or university, or other institution of higher education, recreation center or public park, including state parks and recreation areas, public housing project, or child care facility as defined by Section 402 of Title 10 of the Oklahoma Statutes, shall be punished by a term of imprisonment in the custody of the Department of Corrections for a first offense, or by the imposition of a fine or by both, not exceeding twice that authorized by the appropriate provision of this section and for a second or subsequent violation of this section, a term of imprisonment in the custody of the Department of Corrections, or by the imposition of a fine or by both, not exceeding thrice that authorized by the appropriate provision of this section. Convictions for second and subsequent violations of the provisions of this section shall not be subject to statutory provisions of suspended sentences, deferred sentences, or probation. Section 2-401 of Title 63.

Enforcement

The College will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees who unlawfully manufacture, distribute, dispense, possess or use drugs or alcohol in the workplace, on College property, or as part of a College-sponsored event. Violations of these standards of conduct may result in referral for a criminal prosecution, a requirement of satisfactory completion of an appropriate drug or alcohol rehabilitation program, warning, probation, loss of privileges, fines, restitution, discretionary sanctions, college program/service probation, college program/service suspension, suspension, or expulsion and disciplinary action up to and including termination from employment. A criminal conviction is not required for sanctions to be imposed upon a student or employee for violation of this policy.

Employees are required to notify their supervisor of a criminal conviction for a drug-related offense no later than five calendar days following the conviction.

Employees have the responsibility to refrain from performing sensitive safety functions while a prohibited drug or alcohol is in their system.

Information related to the Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program is distributed annually to employees and students; is available online through MyTCC; included in the student and employee handbooks; and is available for review in the following offices: Student Life, Dean of Student Success and Campus Operations, Human Resources, and Campus Police.