Our History

Tulsa Community College has served Tulsa and northeastern Oklahoma since 1970. Now Oklahoma’s largest, multi-campus community college, TCC serves approximately 23,000 students in college programs annually. Four fully equipped campuses — Metro, Northeast, Southeast and West — populate the Tulsa area, along with several community campuses in the suburban areas.

TCC consistently ranks among the elite of the nation’s 1,150 community college associate degree producers, serves more college students in northeastern Oklahoma than any other public college or university and reports one of the largest freshman classes in Oklahoma every year.

Creative, innovative learning environments on every campus keep pace with rising career areas. Students can choose from associate degree and certificate options ranging from bioscience to tomorrow’s technology.

  • The Thomas K. McKeon Center for Creativity at Metro Campus is home to students engaged in journalism and broadcasting, digital and visual arts, and online learning
  • The Center for Excellence in Energy Innovation at Northeast Campus focuses on alternative energy, with instruction in wind energy, solar energy, biodiesel fuels, electric transportation, and home energy audits.
  • The Health Sciences and Biotechnology Learning Center at Southeast Campus is the instructional center for future professionals in the biological, medical laboratory and nursing fields.
  • The Veterinary Technology Center at West Campus acts as the learning laboratory in intensive nursing care, clinical laboratory procedures, radiology, anesthesiology, dentistry and surgical assistance for students preparing to become Registered Veterinary Technicians.

The TCC Honors Program and Global Education Office each offer students options to deepen their study, examine global issues, foster cross-cultural perspectives and engage in study abroad opportunities throughout the year.

Unveiling TCC’s Time Capsule

In 1995 in honor of Tulsa Junior College’s (now Tulsa Community College) 25th anniversary, a time capsule with items collected from students, faculty and staff was buried at Metro Campus with instructions to be opened in 2020 during the College’s 50th anniversary. The pandemic postponed unveiling the time capsule until 2021. Watch this video as TCC President Leigh Goodson and former TCC Presidents Dean VanTrease and Tom McKeon reveal the items. You may also view a complete list of time capsule items.

Time Capsule Contents

See the original list of time capsule content.

October 12, 1995

(List of contents from 1970’s to 1990’s)

  • a 1970 Black Light Poster
  • Student Activities Packet
    • Tee Shirts of various Student Organizations
    • Phi Theta Kappa sash, collar, tassel and logo
    • Afro-American Student Alliance artifacts: Mud Cloth, pictures of the organization, literature and assorted items
    • Student Handbooks of the ‘70’s
    • Pictures of the first Student Affairs committee and the current committees
  • TJC Packet: 1970’s to 1990’s
    • Picture of various subjects of Metro Campus
    • College Catalogs
    • Newspaper Articles
    • Jewelry
    • 1 pair LEGGS Pantyhose
    • 1 Mood Ring
    • 2 TJC Record Albums of TJC’s Band and Chorus (originals)
    • 1 Computer Tape Canister with artifacts from the Bookstore
  • TJC in the 1990’s
    • Picture of various faculty members and others
    • College Catalogs
    • Newspaper Articles
    • Copies of the 25th Celebration held on all campuses. Programs, etc.
    • Class schedules (first and current)
    • Articles of events from 1970 to 1995
    • Copy of the paper “Horrors and Heroes” (Oklahoma City bombing)
    • 1 Teddy Bear
    • Pictures of the other TJC Campuses
    • 1 TJC ashtray
    • 1 Tulsa County golf ball
    • Pictures of Fast Food and Microwave Dinners

NW from Logo
26” square
18” from capsule to sidewalk N

Dean VanTrease Featured in Voices of Oklahoma

Former TCC President Dean VanTrease was featured recently by the University of Tulsa in a Voices of Oklahoma interview. Listen to Dr. VanTrease explain how the concept of a two-year college had to be sold to the Tulsa community and how the College was born and developed.